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20121216
20121216
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
't harm the patient. right now this economy is getting weak. we've seen higher taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more
taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3
they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big capitalist country didn't have a
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they havto give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. w
century europe. for them the past is not a dry affair but full of exciting people brave he rose and events that could teach us a great deal about our own time. here we decide to concentrate to make a history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest audience in the hope the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people today the same way those of the past inspired my parents brought a 50 anniversary of my father's inauguration. with a digital archive putting them on line so people all over the world could have access. so that kids could learn about the most important moments and reach translated into more than 40 languages. this is a combination of digitizing an amended tag the partnerships to make is the first presidential archive, a digital presidential archive. then my mother's oral histories seven -- seven conversations of have been sealed since 1964 and to commemorate the cuban missile crisis we publish a book called "listening in" the secret white house recordings of john f. kennedy." president kennedy takes to do 65 hours of meetings, conversations are private di
devastated by annihilation and holocaust in europe. so this book is about israel's political culture. and it's most pointedly a biography of a modern sparta, the story of a military society and a powerful defense establishment, a ruling elite who have found it very difficult over the decades to engage in the processes of peace and who have enter a warrior kind of ethos that overpowers every other institution in national life. the ruling elite in israel is not a large class. there have been only ten prime ministers since david men giewr onif you do the double counting, and so it is possible to introduce them as characters in a group biography, and that is what i've tried to do. we must always remind ourselves in looking at any nation's history that all politics is local. and in israel during the first decade of statehood, the pioneer spirit began to flag when israelis were short of water, short of good agricultural base, and when the bright sheen of ben-gurion's leadership began to fade because young people were will hess and less interested in pursuing military service as a career than they
in this country because i think we're getting a real break because europe is having the problems they're having and as a result, the world -- the parts of the world that have assess in savings don't have great choice. you ask europe, they look at us and say we're better. that's why when we get downgraded, our interest rates fail. but i think we're living on borrowed time. but why -- why none of the political -- why are they playing political games when there are such a real issue out there? >> first, it's more than the flight to safety. something is being done now to a degree that's never been done in the history of the united states. we're self-dealing in our own debt. the federal reserve is now the largest overview of u.s. debt and it's purchasing over 707% of all new u.s. debt issuance and it's done the twist of being able to hole down long-term interest rates to help the economy, help the housing market. if you look at people who are buying their debt, their appetite is getting less, not greater. they're buying short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate risks and curr
. if you go to canada or europe, it's very common there, even on the east coast it's very common to. and they have gotten much better machines so you can now put a machine like that in front of the store. >> is that at whole foods at 4th street? >> no, it's at the safeway at 4th street and one at clement and 7th, safeway and one i believe at the marina safeway. >> are they being used? >> yes, they are. >> they are kind of limited, again, if someone comes up with a shopping cart it kind of shuts it down, but for the family or for folks, that is kind of the small-scale solution. that if we get the prices of those down, they are a little expensive at the moment. that could provide convenience in a lot of neighborhoods. and then you would need that distribution system to collect it. i think we do have some solutions. >> director dick-endrizzi? >> just to make sure that commissioner ortiz-cartagena, if the supermarket isn't there and then the small businesses in that half-mile radiuss, they are not required to participate in the program. it's just when the supermarket is establish
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
in europe and insiders look to travel fund. but if you'd like to connect with us we'd like to hear from you go to cbs5.com and click on connect.
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. crossing into the base, i notice that there was a shore patrolman wor
,000 feet, the top of europe. spectacular views of majestic peaks
to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these companies -- these countries no longer have much and common with each other. >> more with anne applebaum from "iron curtain." sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> president obama talks about friday's shooting in newtown, connecticut. >> on friday we learned more than two dozen people were killed when a gunman opened fire. most who died were young children with their whole lives ahead of them. every parent has a heart heavy with hurt. among the fallen more also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping their children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken today. we grieve for the families of those we lost. we keep in our careers the parents of those who survived. as blessed as they are to have children at home, they know their child's innocence has been torn away it far too early. as a nation we have endured far too many of these tragedies over the past few years. an elementary school, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless streetcorners. any of thes
on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drai gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that meanthey automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just
flow through the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an inv
since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. it is no longer these countries no longer even have anything in common except for the common memory of >> more to pulitzer prize winner book tv is a location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. we are now joined by richard ruth, a professor here at the naval academy. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> i teach predominately sian history of why in pre-modern asian history. mostly i concentrate on thailand and vietnam. >> why is it important for students to the south asian history? >> it's very much engaged in that corner of the world we have many allies and partners that we are still working with come and many students at the naval officers southeast they are going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know south east asian history to be comfortable with someand to have
've got europe, and they've got their own excesses. and the real lesson here is not so much inflation at the moment, but how did we ever let these excesses of housing here, housing in spain, housing elsewhere, in ireland, in this japan earlier -- in japan earlier, remember those days when you used to talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo, and a few hundred acres was equal to the value of all the real estate in california. now, that was real -- i don't know if it was true, but each to talk about -- but even to talk about it was a sense of how extremely -- [inaudible] >> do you share the, when you talk to fed officials, do you share -- >> i'm off the record here? >> no, not now. [laughter] no, no, you're fully mic'd. [laughter] when i talk to a fed official up there because happens to be power within the cia, um, they reveal and betray certain kind of frustration with the criticism they've been subjected including the criticism that they're easing too much because they say, well, that was the only course of action. we couldn't have done anything else in the face of
that at least we cannot count them but cannot we bring you see such hatred. >> this is happening in europe, too. i hope you read the history. you are too young. >> my name is david maccormack. my question is only related to the issues that i think it might be something that will give israel the means to prevail. it set up the coast of israel there's maybe $240 billion worth of natural gas and its ongoing in the knesset. the decision to whether the resources can be developed for export so that no large company can come in and develop the resources if they are not allowed to export. i don't know if this is something we've taken a look at, but do you have any thoughts towards the committee recommendations and export of natural gas? >> i have to thank god because in this release to complain a lot and they complain we don't have the oil for years and the amounts we found is amazing. it's much more than you'll ever need in israel. and yes, the export the gas and today what we decided is in the beginning we would export 50% of the gas and evaluate the decision after we continue to drill in the water.
of eastern europe has become very differentiated. the don't even have much in common with one another. >> more with an applebaum on life in poland and hungary. tonight at 8:00. >> on thursday, local officials from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on.
cox to six months before go off to europe? >> guest: well, this is one of the questions that fascinated me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man, i know that. he went to a, he went to a school that was a christian school, and he was a, he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be about more than just yourself, it was meant to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. other less noble intentions, i think. he was graduating from college, he had no other obvious plans, and he had what we would now call a low draft number. he knew there was a good chance he'd be drafted into the american army which had resumed the draft in 19, the end of 1940 but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited, i don't think, about spending the next couple of years training for no apparent purpose. so he was casting around for something. and i think this fulfilled a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> host: so how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >>
they behave? one of the things that happened in 1939 is the renalon we call eastern europe had become very differentiated. these people had nothing in common with one another except for communist occupation. >> more on poland, hungary from her historical narrative "iron curtain" tonight on c-span's "q & a." >> ben bernanke announced monetary acks to sustain the economy, including guidance on how long interest rates will remain at record lows. he said the fed will not raise interest rates as long as the unemployment rate remains at 6.5%. the chairman's remarks are an hour and 15 minutes. >> millions of people who would like to find full time work have found only part-time work or have stopped looking entirely. a return to broad-based prosperity will require sustained improvement in the jobs market which in turn requires stronger economic growth. meanwhile, these flubflunk fluctuations largely reflect swings in energy prices, we remain below our 2% objective over the longer term. this back drop includes high unemployment. purchases of agency mortgage-backed securities continue at a pace of $
on that this struck a chord in europe hasn't it? >> reporter: it sure has the desperate picture of young children being led to safety you can the tearful president speaking to the world after shooting. the world responded, alex, with messages of goodwill. >> i was deeply saddened by friday's senseless violence in connecticut. >> normally find something cheerful to greet you with. >> keir, i apologize, i'm sure you worked hard putting that segment together but some of the audio has dropped out. can you just give me an idea of the types of sentiments that are being expressed? >> reporter: yeah, that's right, the sentiment from all around the world, as i was saying, we have heard from just people on the street, in israel, china, as far afield as china, people expressing deep sorrow about what they have seen and heard. you saw there pictures of the pope during mass this morning, speaking about his grief over what has happened. the queen has sent messages. and so, too alex, places where they have seen similar tragedies. so for example, in the scottish town of dunblane, there was a school shooting in 1
or on a battlefield to work captured in europe one was a north africa and they were transported into harm's way of the danger is of the government. instead of hardest claim the you hear is the real reason judicial review does not make sense it poses a threat to to military operation they will actively interfere and the court should not do that. is the interference was there it would be a serious problem but we have four years of jurisprudence with guantanamo detainee is where they made this same argument to interfere with the government to conduct the war on terror is some and there has been no suggestion that has happened d.c. jurisprudence is pro-government of protection of information into my knowledge not one allegation in a sensitive deprivation has gotten out to and the habeas case since the that's huge show court has impacted operations anywhere in the world if it is mythical the end it all the furthers the cause and make up the wrong way and will stop there. >> perfect. >> i want to start off by thinking them to put the issue together it is worthy of the debate and this is a great forma
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)